Mastermind Moments logo image

The One Change Tech Leaders Make To Be The Person That Others Turn To Or Go With

You want to be a leader that others turn to or go with. But the competition is immense. Leaders who stand out have learned to avoid two pitfalls by focusing on one key element: They know how to be noticed, remembered and talked about.

You want to be a leader that others turn to or go with. But the competition is immense. Leaders who stand out have learned to avoid two pitfalls by focusing on one key element: They know how to be noticed, remembered and talked about.

Are you overlooked?

You want to be the leader others turn to and go with. It’s true in your current position. It’s true if you look for a different position. It’s true if you seek to be renowned in your space.

But you have a problem.

There are other leaders. They have voices and avenues of influence. They also want to be the one others turn to and go with. And they don’t have to do anything to beat out someone other than to let leaders keep making the same mistakes that get them overlooked. 

In 1957, Nobel economist Herbert Simon coined the term “satisfice.” It’s the combination of satisfy and sufficient. His argument: People satisfice. Given options, they will choose the least uncertain. 

I do this. I don’t have time to do exhaustive research about every decision before me. I will choose the least uncertain restaurant to eat at tonight, even if I force myself to try something new. 

People can always be more certain about a choice. But that’s tiring. It’s easier to be less uncertain.

How can others be less uncertain about you so that you are the one they turn to or go with?

When I started CIO Mastermind, I set out to be known, liked and trusted. They are good goals. For you, I want to shift the emphasis, bring a different angle to it. I want you to be noticed, remembered and talked about. 

Two Reasons You Don’t Stand Out

You say too much

The more said, the less processed. Brains fatigue.. They conserve energy. At best, we process 5-9 ideas at a time. When you are talking to your executive peers and to leaders, they already have a full slate of ideas competing for their attention at any one time. When you are trying to be hired, if everything on your resume is great then nothing is great.

You show too much

Brains need a memory structure. They need a file to place you in. If you “show all your cards,” you store none. You are remembered as a deck of cards. If you show a card, and tell the person to remember this card, they will remember the card.

Whether it is on a resume or in a work environment, if your message is unclear and your skills are too vague, you are lost in the shuffle. 

If you say too much and show too much, you have made yourself too complex; it is too much work to recognize what’s different about you, to remember you, or to recall you to another. 

Set Yourself Apart

You are unique. I love this about you, and so do others. You may tackle similar responsibilities as your peers, but you do it in a manner differently than your peers. 

If I put you in a room with others who share your same role, you can set yourself apart. If I put you in a room with others of differing roles, you can stand out. How?

Focus on the one dynamics that are true of you:

1. What one value do you bring?

2. What one reputation do you possess?

3. What one outstanding feature do you portray?

4. What one thing is different about you?

Let me give you the concept and then an example. Yes, your skill-set is amazing. Yes, you have great experience you can draw from. The list is super and long. But lists are forgettable. Drill down to ones. People don’t buy similarities, they buy differences. 

I’m a CEO. I’m a former CIO. I have a range of skill-sets and experiences. But I want to be noticed, remembered and talked about. So:

My value: I develop executive skill-sets in technology leaders.

My reputation: I’m a geek with executive tendencies.

My outstanding feature: I’m likable.

My difference: I make you laugh. 

I don’t get lost in a crowd. It could be a crowd of peers or a crowd of resumes, but I stand out. I have worked on it, and I continue to work on it. I won’t be everyone’s choice. But I’m the right choice in the right moment, and I will be able to step into that moment because someone recognized, remembered and talked about me.

You deserve the same. Whatever you do, please don’t shelve this article. Take it with you over the summer. Hammer away at what is your value, reputation, feature and difference. CIO Mastermind has a unique system to draw these out of you if you need. Let us help you stand out here

The One Change Tech Leaders Make To Be The Person That Others Turn To Or Go With
Categories:
Photo by:
Kenny Eliason

All Our Services

For CIOs, IT executives and business stakeholders for FREE.
* We respect your privacy. Unsubscribe anytime.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.